Good News, Bad News and Some Crime News Reports

The good crime news is that from 2013, major crime stats across the US began to fall. But police warn that despite the reduction in some categories, notably homicide, rape, robbery and assault, other categories are creeping back up.

This bad crime news applies to states like California, where there has been an upsurge in property crimes this year. Authorities are quick to point out that this could be due to policies to reduce prison overcrowding by releasing less violent offenders.

While government policy makers and crime statisticians debate the effects of new measures, for the bad guys, it’s just business as usual – some they win and some they lose…

 

Crime news takeaways

How many of us sometimes wake up at night, thirsty and go to the kitchen to get a drink. Imagine the shock a Kansas woman must have had last week when she surprised a stranger at 3:30 a.m. in her kitchen? The weirdness doesn’t end there though… he was standing at her freezer eating a batch of frozen cookie dough. The 28-year-old said he thought he was at his aunt’s home and got hungry?

But, crime news lesson one. The intruder entered the home through an unlocked back door – proving our point that leaving your doors and windows unlocked makes for lousy home security. By the way, the intruder was arrested on suspicion of aggravated burglary.

Not so lucky was the Philadelphia man who came home and surprised a burglar vandalizing his bedroom, early Monday evening. The intruder rapidly morphed into an assailant brandishing a tire iron who left the homeowner dismayed, perplexed and somewhat beaten-up. The robber escaped with jewellery… the homeowner, with his life!

This crime news takeaway here is, if for any reason you suspect there may be someone in your house when you return home, go back out the door and get someplace safe – a neighbour, your locked car, even the sidewalk and call 911immediately. Don’t let anger or shock cloud your better judgement. The homeowner in this report had to be rushed to hospital for treatment.

If you think chances are slim that you’ll ever surprise a burglar, think again. It happens often. For one California woman, the story has a better ending. Saturday afternoon around 3:30 p.m. according to police, a 25-year-old woman arrived home to find an intruder in her bedroom. As soon as the crook realized he’d been spotted, he ran from the house.

With the woman’s’ description of the guy, police were able to pick him up 40 minutes later. He was arrested when the victim positively identified him as the intruder and items taken from the home were found in his possession.

The crime news takeaway here is; don’t ever confront criminals if you don’t have to. The woman in California is one of the lucky ones but news reports are full of accounts of homeowners getting injured or assaulted when trying to take on intruders.

 

Sometimes the good guys win

Crime news takeaways aren’t just for the law abiding but sometimes forgetful victims. Sloppy criminals should tighten up some basic etiquette. Every kindergartener knows when you finish going potty, you’re supposed to flush. And you really should bin your trash when the contents are finished… Nobody told this New Mexico suspect the basic rules. The story starts in early September with an empty home and relaxed burglar, obviously taking his time. While the bad guy was finding loot to the value of $250,000, he needed a toilet break and had a can of coke from the fridge.

This is where his manners let him down; he didn’t flush the toilet and left the can on the table in the kitchen. When the police arrived later, they didn’t waste time looking for fingerprints; they found that they had enough evidence to analyze the DNA from the can and toilet, it matched the suspect and he was arrested.

We’ve come a long way since the days when fingerprints and eye witnesses were the only way to get a positive ID. These crime news reports all feature typical day-to-day crimes. Burglars, working alone, target empty houses – usually unarmed and unprepared to face an outraged homeowner. The one exception here clearly illustrates why confrontation is a bad idea.

 

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